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Posted 11/9/2012 1:50pm by Susan Anderson.

I just got a great email from Ramsey, an adventurous and really good ginger grower, who shared a tip for storage that I want to extend to all of you: He uses a vacuum sealed bag to store his baby ginger in the refrigerator. After 33 days he opened one of the packs from the refrigerator and it was just as he had sealed it, crisp and fresh, full of ginger flavor. This would be a great value added tip for growers trying to sell into a retail market over the winter. They could invest in a vacuum sealer for this and other products. Ramsey proffers that the ginger is not injured by the colder refrigerator temps, nor is it dessicated by the dry refrigerator environment because it is packed sans oxygen in the vacuum sealed bag. Ramsey, thank you so much for sharing your experience.

Posted 7/10/2012 2:34pm by Susan Anderson.

Keep soil temperatures below 90F by using some of these techniques:

  • Measure soil temps with a thermometer to keep temps from getting too high
  • Use shade cloth over the crop - take a look at this article that talks about a study conducted at NC State regarding shade cloth: http://www.greenhousegrower.com/article/27857/black-shade-cloth-versus-reflective-screens
  • If growing in containers, move containers pot to pot to reduce sun exposure on the outside of the containers. This also helps to shade containers using ginger canopy.
  • If water source is cooler than soil temps and soil temp is above 90F, water the ginger in the late morning or early afternoon with the cooler water.
Posted 11/29/2011 1:01pm by Susan Anderson.

In areas where root know nematode populations are suspected to be high, it is important to keep an eye on your ginger crop.  It is also important not to reuse this ginger crop for seed!  Here is a photograph of ginger with root knot nematode damage.  Note the bubbly looking rhizome flesh.  This disease organism can infect crops other than ginger so a population might already be in place where susceptible crops have been grown before the ginger crop.  The harvested ginger rhizomes with root knot nematode damage are fine to eat!  They are poor seed stock...

Posted 11/29/2011 12:52pm by Susan Anderson.

This pictures shows ginger foliage that is not properly unfurling.  This is caused by a lack of general nutrition during active growth.  Also note the tip burning.  This is also a sign of general nutrient deficiency.  It is very important to feed ginger throughout the season, at least three to five times, depending upon soil type, water regimine and availability of nutrients in the soil or media where ginger is growing.

Info About OrderingJanuary 8th, 2013

Ordering is open for the 2013 season. Sign up for the newsletter (blue envelope to the right on any page of the website) to receive cultural updates through the season, recipes in the fall and an aler

Beneficial MicrobesDecember 20th, 2012

Ginger Yields Better with High Beneficial Soil Microbe Populations Use products like Actinovate, Contans, and Trichoderma to build these populations in a soil that is not robust in beneficial micro or

Vacuum SealingNovember 9th, 2012

I just got a great email from Ramsey, an adventurous and really good ginger grower, who shared a tip for storage that I want to extend to all of you: He uses a vacuum sealed bag to store his baby ging

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